Developing a Mental Health Court: An Interdisciplinary Curriculum

Recent Posts

Congress Approves FY18 Funding Levels for Criminal Justice Programs

Congress Approves FY18 Funding Levels for Criminal Justice Programs

Recently, the U.S. Congress approved the $1.3 trillion Fiscal Year 2018 Omnibus Appropriations bill that would set government funding through Sep. 30, 2018. The bill provides $30.3 billion for the Department of Justice and includes $2.9 billion for various state and local law enforcement assistance grant programs.

National Association of Attorneys General Highlights Hawaii’s Victim Restitution Revamp

National Association of Attorneys General Highlights Hawaii’s Victim Restitution Revamp

Victim restitution can be a vitally important part of a crime victim’s recovery, yet is often poorly understood and managed by states. Very few states have been able to show substantial progress in improving restitution, but Hawaii has done so and has the data to prove it. This success story was highlighted at the National Association of Attorneys General annual winter meeting in February in Washington, DC, in the panel discussion “Helping Crime Victims Recover from Financial Losses.”

Megan Quattlebaum Named Director of the CSG Justice Center

Megan Quattlebaum Named Director of the CSG Justice Center

The Council of State Governments (CSG) recently announced that Megan Quattlebaum, research scholar in law at Yale University Law School and lecturer in law at Columbia University Law School, will be the next director of The CSG Justice Center.

Announcements

Forty-First Juvenile Justice Symposium

Forty-First Juvenile Justice Symposium

The symposium, hosted by the Mississippi Division of Public Safety Planning-Programs and the Mississippi Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee, will provide a venue where participants from varying disciplines can receive appropriate resources to help prevent juvenile delinquency by educating the professionals who serve throughout the state of Mississippi and the nation.

Apply Now: Project Safe Neighborhoods

Apply Now: Project Safe Neighborhoods

This program provides support to state, local, and tribal efforts to reduce violent crime through a comprehensive approach that combines targeted law enforcement efforts with community engagement, prevention, and reentry efforts.

Webinars

Supporting People with Serious Mental Illnesses and Reducing Their Risk of Contact with the Criminal Justice System

Supporting People with Serious Mental Illnesses and Reducing Their Risk of Contact with the Criminal Justice System

This webinar provides an overview of the primer, Supporting People with Serious Mental Illnesses and Reducing Their Risk of Contact with the Criminal Justice System, a resource designed to help familiarize psychiatrists with the Risk-Need-Responsivity (RNR) Model—which is used by criminal justice professionals to identify the factors that contribute to a person’s risk of recidivism and tailor interventions based on the identified factors—and provide information on ways psychiatrists can help address the particular needs of this population.

Publications

Juvenile Court Statistics 2015

Juvenile Court Statistics 2015

This report from the National Center for Juvenile Justice describes delinquency cases and petitioned status offense cases that courts with juvenile jurisdiction processed in 2015 and presents trends since 2005.

Modern Justice: Using Data to Reinvent America’s Crisis Response Systems

Modern Justice: Using Data to Reinvent America’s Crisis Response Systems

This publication from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation examines how public safety personnel, health professionals, and service providers can contribute to solving the problem of Frequent Utilizers—those who cycle in and out of jails, hospitals, shelters, and other social service programs at a startlingly high rate.

Recent Headlines

How to Reduce Incarceration? Change Prosecutors’ Incentives

Sending someone to prison in Pennsylvania costs around $42,000 a year by conservative estimates. So if a prosecutor is requesting a five-year sentence, they would have to justify not only an approximate $210,000 cost to taxpayers but also the decision to interrupt the convicted person’s connection to family, employment, and access to public benefits.

Do Jail Diversion Programs Really Work?

When diversion is done well its results can be significant. Cook County’s diversion program (in Illinois), which is widely recognized as a model, is an example: a year after finishing felony diversion, 97 percent of graduates have no new felony arrests, and 86 percent have no new arrests of any kind.

Judge: Tennessee Can’t Revoke Driver’s Licenses from People Who Can’t Pay Court Costs

“Practically speaking, this is going to be a huge benefit to the low-income people of Tennessee who are going to be able to drive to work, take their kids to school, go to the grocery store, visit the doctor, without fear of being arrested and prosecuted for driving without a license,” Claudia Wilner, a senior attorney with the National Center for Law and Economic Justice, said.