Media Clips

Use this filter to limit the search items below.

Jails Are No Substitute for a Mental Health System

Using our criminal justice system as a substitute for a fully functioning mental health system doesn’t make sense. It doesn’t make sense for law enforcement officers, who often put their lives at risk when they are called upon to intervene in a mental health crisis. It doesn’t make sense for courts, which are inundated with cases involving people with mental illness. It doesn’t make sense for people who have mental health conditions, who often would benefit more from treatment and intensive supervision.

Legislature Takes First Steps on Corrections Reform, but Work Remains

JournalStar.com – Government & Politics By Zach Pluhacek Two measures aimed at addressing concerns with Nebraska’s prisons and criminal justice system passed with overwhelming support from state lawmakers on Thursday. The first bill (LB598), which passed 47-0, takes aim at […]

One Town is Going to Try Not Arresting Heroin Users

Police Chief Lenny Campanello Gloucester, Massachusetts, may change how we handle drug addiction. Fed up with the opiate epidemic spreading through Gloucester, he posted a message on May 4 on department’s Facebook page, vowing the department will not charge drug users, but will connect them to treatment instead.

Prisoners Might Get Access to Pell Grants for First Time in Two Decades

The U.S. Department of Education is poised to announce a limited exemption to the federal ban on prisoners receiving Pell Grants to attend college while they are incarcerated. Correctional education experts and other sources said they expect the department to issue a waiver under the experimental sites program, which allows the feds to lift certain rules that govern aid programs in the spirit of experimentation. If the project is successful, it would add to momentum for the U.S. Congress to consider overturning the ban it passed on the use of Pell for prisoners in 1994.

‘Orange is New Black’ Author Encourages Felon Hiring

The author of “Orange is the New Black” joined federal and county prosecutors Wednesday morning at Cobo Center to discuss the need to hire individuals returning to the workforce after felony incarcerations. Kerman said the women who served time with her often developed valuable skills in areas including industrial kitchens and warehouses. While incarcerated, Kerman said she worked as an electrician.

Contra Costa County to End Solitary Confinement

In preliminary legal settlements announced Tuesday, Contra Costa County’s probation department has agreed to end the practice of solitary confinement for youths in juvenile hall, while the county’s office of education will guarantee appropriate services for all youths with disabilities.

Snyder Calls for ‘Presumptive Parole’ for Some Inmates

Gov. Rick Snyder called for broad reforms in sentencing policies and improved criminal rehabilitation programs Monday in a major address aimed at better controlling the more than $2 billion a year the state spends on criminal justice.

Skyrocketing Prison Costs Have States Targeting Recidivism, Sentencing Practices

It is not often that the American Civil Liberties Union and the Southern Poverty Law Center find common cause with conservative Republicans in Alabama. But on Tuesday, both sides will celebrate when Gov. Robert Bentley (R) signs legislation that will substantially cut the number of prisoners in state custody.

New Efforts Aim To Keep The Mentally Ill Out Of Jail

Earlier this month, a coalition including the Council of State Governments Justice Center, the American Psychiatric Foundation and the National Association of Counties kicked off a national campaign to encourage local jurisdictions to collect data on the jailed mentally ill and adopt strategies to avoid incarceration.