Media Clips

Use this filter to limit the search items below.

New Jail Employment Program Created to ‘Break the Cycle’

“Correctional Career Pathways” is the first of its kind in Tennessee and possibly nationally, said Kim Gass, Greeneville City Schools adult education supervisor, who will oversee the program in Greene County.

The initiative, which offers classes to qualified inmates and then places them in jobs in local industry, will be launched in early April. A first class of 10 female inmates will gradate next week.

Ohio Wants to Link Inmates to Jobs Upon Release

Prison Director Gary Mohr outlined initiatives during a statewide reentry coalition meeting Thursday in Chillicothe that would recruit businesses to not only consider employing someone with a criminal record, but interview them for a job before they are released.

Preparing Prisoners for an Evolving Workplace

Prisons should aid the re-entry process by providing vocational education and training for prisoners, according to a new position paper released by the Northwestern University Program for Prison Reentry Strategies.

Food Service Training Aims to End Recidivism

Those who work at the Prince William-Manassas Regional Adult Detention Center are always looking for ways to reduce recidivism, and they hope a new program they’ve recently instituted might help. Nine inmates recently passed the National Restaurant Association’s ServSafe food protection manager’s course, which teaches people how to safely cook, prepare and store food.

3rd Prison Reform Measure Heads to Floor of Legislature

The Nebraska Legislature now has a trio of bills to debate on one of the biggest issues of the year: prison reform.

The Legislature’s Judiciary Committee advanced the last of three bills Wednesday that seek to reduce chronic overcrowding in state prisons, improve inmate rehabilitation and increase oversight of the state prison system.

Haunted by the Past: A Criminal Record Shouldn’t Ruin a Career

Consider that over-reliance on background checks inevitably screens out qualified, trustworthy job applicants. More than one in four adults in America has a criminal record, and the vast majority of them currently pose no threat to public safety and will not go on to commit crimes in the future.

Prison Reform Deserves Attention from State

That old saying, “A day of reckoning is fast approaching,” is so apropos when discussing Alabama’s seriously overcrowded prisons.

Addressing solely the finances of prison reform, it would cost $840 million to build new prisons that would reduce Alabama’s prison capacity of 190 percent to just 100 percent. That $840 million is 44 percent of the state’s unearmarked $1.9 billion general fund budget.