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Schools Must Abandon Zero-Tolerance Discipline

By helping principals and teachers address the underlying causes of misconduct—and giving them options other than suspension and expulsion—forward-thinking school districts across the nation are demonstrating how positive discipline can improve educational outcomes.

Districts Re-Evaluate How to Keep Kids in School and Out of Trouble

The Council of State Governments (CSG) Justice released a report this month that argued that schools should replace the out-of-school suspension model with a model that focuses on looking for problematic behaviors and acting to keep students in the classroom, focusing primarily on addressing the underlying issues that cause bad behavior in students rather than punishing the behavior itself.

Editorial: A Better Approach to School Discipline

A new report by the Council of State Governments Justice Center, a nonprofit policy group, shows that states and school districts can cut down on suspensions and unwarranted arrests at school within relatively short periods without sacrificing safety or disrupting the school environment.

Study: Prevent Bad Behavior in Schools, Don’t Punish It

The Council of State Governments Justice Center released a nationwide study yesterday entitled The School Discipline Consensus Report that suggests that school officials focus on improving the learning environment rather than spending so much time dwelling on how to react to bad behavior.

Schools Urged to Spare the Rod on Suspensions

Harsh “zero-tolerance” disciplinary policies at public schools across the country have produced unnecessary student suspensions for even the slightest violations of conduct, leading to higher risk of failing, dropping out and criminal prosecution for minors, according to a comprehensive new survey released Tuesday.

School Discipline Reform: A Model for Bottom-Up Improvement

Susan Ferriss at The Center for Public Integrity noted the report “encourages schools and lawmakers to embrace ideas such as conflict resolution and counseling – rather than suspensions, expulsions and forcing kids into juvenile court for infractions as minor as cursing or shoving matches.”