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Second Chance Act Programs Supporting Mentoring and Transitional Services for Youth

SRR forum participants

Program participants engage in culturally specific, developmentally appropriate services through Southwest Key’s Un Puente al Hogar program, a 2015 SCA Latino/a Youth grantee in Austin, Texas.

Through the Second Chance Act, multiple programs provided funding for nonprofit organizations—including faith-based, tribal, and community-based nonprofit organizations—and federally recognized tribal communities to provide mentoring and transitional services for youth returning to their communities from secure confinement settings, as well as for children and families of incarcerated parents. The U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) administers the awards.

Second Chance Act Strengthening Relationships Between Young Fathers, Young Mothers, and Their Children

This  grant program supports the implementation and delivery of culturally appropriate and gender-specific transitional services that include one-on-one, group, and peer mentoring services for youth and young adults up to age 24 who are fathers and mothers and in the criminal justice system. Other services may include a broad range of activities, including providing case management, assessing both risk factors and person strengths that can affect recidivism, substance use treatment, and other supportive, comprehensive services to promote responsible parenting and family engagement.

For more information, see the most recent OJJDP grant solicitation

 

Second Chance Act Supporting Latino/a Youth from Out-of-Home Placement to the Community

This grant program provided funding to nonprofit organizations with a demonstrable history of providing community-based reentry programs and services to Latino/a youth. Funds supported mentoring and comprehensive transitional services that emphasized the development of life and parenting skills for Latino/a youth who had been in the justice system. Priority consideration was given to organizations that used evidence-based reentry strategies and incorporated an independent evaluation of the project. Deliverables and allowable uses for grant funds included:

  • Developing strategic partnerships;
  • Providing transitional services;
  • Collecting robust performance measures of implementation and impact;
  • Providing mentoring services; and
  • Promoting holistic approaches to reentry, such as family and community engagement and educational opportunities.

For more information, see the most recent OJJDP grant solicitation from 2015.

Second Chance Act Strengthening Families and Children of Incarcerated Parents

This grant program provided funding to nonprofit organizations that delivered services to foster family engagement between incarcerated parents, children, and caregivers, as well as to promote positive youth development. Funds supported the development and expansion of services for children who had a parent incarcerated at a Federal Bureau of Prisons correctional facility. Those efforts included:

  • Developing or delivering programs that enhanced the life skills of children of incarcerated parents, such as mentoring, case management, counseling, youth coaching, and academic support;
  • Providing services to facilitate communication between incarcerated parents and their children and caregiver, such as transportation to facilities, reading on tape, phone calls, emails, letters, and televisits;
  • Providing family-driven and youth-guided services that focused on promoting family engagement; and
  • Working with facilities to implement policies that fostered further family engagement. 

For more information, see the most recent OJJDP grant solicitation from 2015.

Second Chance Act Juvenile Mentoring Initiative

This grant program provided funding to state, local, and tribal governments; public universities and colleges; and nonprofit organizations to develop, implement, and expand mentoring programs and transitional services for youth returning to their communities from secure confinement. Grantees integrated best practices into mentoring service models, developed strategies to recruit and retain mentors, assessed the needs of their target population, and developed services and partnerships to address those needs.

For more information, see the most recent OJJDP grant solicitation from 2011.

Past Grantees

OJJDP has awarded 38 grants for mentoring and transitional services for youth or young adults: