Corrections In the News

Announcements

[Apply Now] Soros Justice Fellowships

[Apply Now] Soros Justice Fellowships

The fellowships fund outstanding individuals to undertake projects that advance reform, spur debate, and catalyze change on a range of issues facing the U.S. criminal justice system.

National Conference on Higher Education in Prison

National Conference on Higher Education in Prison

This annual conference will bring people together to support the expansion of quality higher education in prison, discuss how to empower students in prison and after release, and to work to shape public discussion about education and incarceration.

Press Releases

Bipartisan Leaders Set to Reauthorize Landmark Criminal Justice Bill; Gathering Celebrates Half-Decade of Recidivism Reduction

Bipartisan Leaders Set to Reauthorize Landmark Criminal Justice Bill; Gathering Celebrates Half-Decade of Recidivism Reduction

Washington, D.C.—In an extraordinary display of bipartisan cooperation, Senators Rob Portman (R-OH) and Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Congressmen Danny K. Davis (D-IL), Howard Coble (R-NC), and Bobby Scott (D-VA) came together today to mark the five-year anniversary of the Second Chance Act and to announce that they, along with other Senate and House leaders, will be introducing legislation reauthorizing the landmark act today. To read the press release for this event, click here.

Justice Reinvestment Initiative meets House approval

TOPEKA, Kan.—The bipartisan Kansas Justice Reinvestment initiative, a research and data-driven program aimed at promoting public safety while reducing corrections spending, took one step closer to reality on March 1.

Recent headlines

Coalition of Criminal Justice Groups Oppose HUD’s Proposed Change to Disparate Impact Rule

A coalition of criminal justice groups issued a statement today voicing opposition to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) recent proposal to amend its so-called “disparate impact” rule under the Fair Housing Act. The disparate impact rule permitted people to bring legal claims against housing policies and practices that, while not motivated by discriminatory intent, predictably harmed protected groups, including people of color.