Corrections In the News

Announcements

Forty-First Juvenile Justice Symposium

Forty-First Juvenile Justice Symposium

The symposium, hosted by the Mississippi Division of Public Safety Planning-Programs and the Mississippi Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee, will provide a venue where participants from varying disciplines can receive appropriate resources to help prevent juvenile delinquency by educating the professionals who serve throughout the state of Mississippi and the nation.

2018 National Forum on Criminal Justice

The forum will showcase programs, research, and technologies that help justice practitioners and decision makers in states, local communities, and tribal nations address pressing public safety issues.

Press Releases

Bipartisan Leaders Set to Reauthorize Landmark Criminal Justice Bill; Gathering Celebrates Half-Decade of Recidivism Reduction

Bipartisan Leaders Set to Reauthorize Landmark Criminal Justice Bill; Gathering Celebrates Half-Decade of Recidivism Reduction

Washington, D.C.—In an extraordinary display of bipartisan cooperation, Senators Rob Portman (R-OH) and Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Congressmen Danny K. Davis (D-IL), Howard Coble (R-NC), and Bobby Scott (D-VA) came together today to mark the five-year anniversary of the Second Chance Act and to announce that they, along with other Senate and House leaders, will be introducing legislation reauthorizing the landmark act today. To read the press release for this event, click here.

Justice Reinvestment Initiative meets House approval

TOPEKA, Kan.—The bipartisan Kansas Justice Reinvestment initiative, a research and data-driven program aimed at promoting public safety while reducing corrections spending, took one step closer to reality on March 1.

Recent headlines

How to Reduce Incarceration? Change Prosecutors’ Incentives

Sending someone to prison in Pennsylvania costs around $42,000 a year by conservative estimates. So if a prosecutor is requesting a five-year sentence, they would have to justify not only an approximate $210,000 cost to taxpayers but also the decision to interrupt the convicted person’s connection to family, employment, and access to public benefits.