Developing a Mental Health Court: An Interdisciplinary Curriculum

Recent Posts

Judge Steven Leifman Named A ‘Public Official of the Year’

Judge Steven Leifman Named A ‘Public Official of the Year’

Judge Steven Leifman of Miami-Dade County, Florida was recently named “Public Official of the Year” by Governing magazine for his commitment to addressing the high prevalence of mental illness among people in the criminal justice system.

Q&A with Utah’s Assistant State Courts Administrator Richard Schwermer

Q&A with Utah’s Assistant State Courts Administrator Richard Schwermer

The Council of State Governments Justice Center talked to Richard Schwermer, Utah’s assistant state courts administrator, about mental health courts in his state and his use of Developing a Mental Health Court: An Interdisciplinary Curriculum, the CSG Justice Center’s free online multimedia curriculum for people and teams seeking to start, maintain, or learn about mental health courts.

Two Counties Use Online Mental Health Court Curriculum to Work Toward Program Sustainability

Two Counties Use Online Mental Health Court Curriculum to Work Toward Program Sustainability

For many jurisdictions, sustaining a mental health court program can prove challenging both monetarily and in terms of staff capacity. Grant funding often provides the seed money to plan or launch a mental health court. But obtaining additional funds to keep the program running once grants run out requires leveraging other funding streams and maintaining strong partnerships with stakeholders.

A Message from The CSG Justice Center’s Executive Committee Chair and Vice-Chair

A Message from The CSG Justice Center’s Executive Committee Chair and Vice-Chair

The tragedies of the past week weigh heavily on us. As public safety officials in our respective states, we were outraged to see the very people working to protect the public murdered because of the uniform they wear. We also feel deeply for residents of communities who, because of the color of their skin, fear the people who have sworn an oath to protect them.

State Standards: Building Better Mental Health Courts

State Standards: Building Better Mental Health Courts

As formal “mental health courts” (MHCs) enter their third decade in existence, policymakers are increasingly looking to distill the best of research and practice into state standards that foster high-quality programing and accountability for MHCs in their states.

Announcements

Apply Now: Media for a Just Society Awards

Apply Now: Media for a Just Society Awards

The National Council on Crime & Delinquency is now accepting submissions for its 2017 Media for a Just Society Awards, which recognize media that furthers public understanding of criminal justice, juvenile justice, and child welfare.

Apply Now: SAMHSA Treatment Drug Courts

Apply Now: SAMHSA Treatment Drug Courts

The purpose of this program is to expand or enhance substance use disorder treatment services in existing adult problem-solving courts and in adult Tribal Healing to Wellness courts.

Webinars

Developing Program Phases in a Mental Health Court

Developing Program Phases in a Mental Health Court

As jurisdictions refine their practices within mental health courts they often seek additional information on using a phased approach as a way to structure program participation. How are program phases created? What makes them effective? How many program phases should a mental health court have? This webinar focusses on answering these questions and others.

Understanding the Role of Trauma in Recovery and Recidivism

Understanding the Role of Trauma in Recovery and Recidivism

During this recorded live session, presenters reviewed cutting edge research on trauma and its impacts; explored best practices for trauma interventions, services, and the development of a trauma-informed approach; and identified specific considerations for utilizing a trauma-informed approach when working with people involved in the justice system.

Publications

Recent Headlines

Wyoming Sentencing Reform Effort Moves Forward

The bill also changes parole revocation. If the violation is not a felony, the Wyoming Board of Parole may send the offender back to prison for 120 days for the first violation and 180 days for the second. Currently, people who violate parole are sent back to prison for an average of 2½ years, Christensen said.

Progress and Unfinished Business in the Fight against the Criminalization of Poverty

The problems we found in Ferguson aren’t isolated. They exist around the country. That’s why earlier this year, the Civil Rights Division and the department’s Office for Access to Justice sent a dear colleague letter to state and local judges to help them guard against unlawful fine, fee and bail practices that can trap people in inescapable cycles of debt, poverty and incarceration.

Clean the Slate in Pennsylvania

A new law in Pennsylvania will seal criminal records from public view for people convicted of some second- and third-degree misdemeanors, so long as they completed their punishments and stayed free from arrest for 10 years.