Recent Posts

Washington State Works to Improve Employment Outcomes for Incarcerated Youth

Washington State Works to Improve Employment Outcomes for Incarcerated Youth

Washington is one state that has been deliberate in its efforts to promote job readiness and vocational success for its incarcerated youth, many of whom are 18 to 20 years of age. From October 2013 to September 2015, Washington State’s Juvenile Rehabilitation division—which operates juvenile correctional facilities across the state under the Department of Social and Health Services—administered a Job Readiness to Employment Project called Manufacturing Academy, made possible through a 2013 Second Chance Act Juvenile Demonstration grant.

Announcements

Apply Now: Juvenile Probation Reform Academy

Apply Now: Juvenile Probation Reform Academy

The Juvenile Probation Reform Academy is designed to instruct probation and parole directors and managers on the core principles demonstrated by research to reduce recidivism and improve other outcomes for youth in the juvenile justice system.

Apply Now: Resiliency in Communities After Stress and Trauma (ReCAST)

Apply Now: Resiliency in Communities After Stress and Trauma (ReCAST)

The purpose of this program is to assist high-risk youth and families and promote resilience and equity in communities that have recently faced civil unrest through implementation of evidence-based, violence prevention, and community youth engagement programs, as well as linkages to trauma-informed behavioral health services.

Apply Now: FY2016 Comprehensive School Safety Initiative

Apply Now: FY2016 Comprehensive School Safety Initiative

The initiative is carried out through partnerships between researchers, educators, and other stakeholders, including law enforcement and mental health professionals. Funding under this program may be used to support and address a wide range of school safety activities, such as school resource officer training, school-based mental health, or improved disciplinary policies.

Webinars

Improving Outcomes for Young Adults in the Justice System

Improving Outcomes for Young Adults in the Justice System

This webinar focuses on how juvenile and criminal justice policymakers and agency leaders can work to reduce recidivism and improve other outcomes for young adults between the ages of 18 and 24 who are involved in these systems. Presenters discuss young adults’ distinct needs, as well as the limited research available on what works to address these needs, and recommend potential steps that policymakers, juvenile and adult criminal justice agency leaders, researchers, and the field can take to improve outcomes for this group of young people.

Using New Checklists to Assess Juvenile Justice Systems

Using New Checklists to Assess Juvenile Justice Systems

This webinar highlights three checklists focused on reducing juvenile recidivism, which are now available on the CSG Justice Center website. These checklists can help state and local officials assess whether their juvenile justice system’s policies and practices are aligned with the research on “what works” to reduce recidivism, and to identify opportunities for improvement.

Beyond Adverse Childhood Experiences

Beyond Adverse Childhood Experiences

The archived webinar covers the use of well-being questions in domains of connection, coping, and stress and focuses on a two-generation strategy addressing the needs of parents and their children.

Publications

Criminal Records and Your Job Rights

Criminal Records and Your Job Rights

This fact sheet from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission helps clarify the rights of young workers with respect to criminal history.

Recent headlines

Editorial: New York Teenagers Dumped in Adult Jails

The Supreme Court has said emphatically that it is morally and constitutionally wrong to equate offenses committed by adolescents with those carried out by adults. And research shows that prosecuting adolescents as adults needlessly destroys their lives and turns many of them into career criminals. Yet these lessons have not penetrated some states.

Youth-Offense Data Shared Under Arkansas Bills

The Arkansas House and Senate Judiciary committees both approved bills that would allow state officials to share some data on youth offenders. Senate Bill 8 and its parallel legislation, House Bill 1013, would permit the Department of Human Services’ Youth Services Division to release juvenile records to any person or group for the purpose of research.

Conneticut Governor Pushes for Juvenile System Reform

The governor’s proposal would allow offenders 20-years-old or younger to be tried as young adults within the juvenile justice system rather than the adult system. It would also eliminate bail for most minor crimes.

Roanoke schools study alternatives to student suspensions

Zero tolerance policies proliferated after the 1999 shooting at Columbine High School. But for several years, schools have been warned that those policies are ineffective. In Virginia, the wake-up call was a 2015 report by the Center for Public Integrity that showed the state led the nation in the number of times schools referred student behavior to law enforcement, sometimes for behavior that wasn’t criminal.