Second Chance Act Statewide Recidivism Reduction Program

This program helps executive-branch policymakers and state corrections departments plan and implement systemwide reforms aimed at reducing recidivism.

Recent Posts

Oregon Kicks Off Data-Driven Review of State’s Criminal Justice, Behavioral Health Systems

Oregon Kicks Off Data-Driven Review of State’s Criminal Justice, Behavioral Health Systems

Oregon’s Behavioral Health Justice Reinvestment Steering Committee met on Oct. 31 to officially launch the state’s participation in the federally funded Justice Reinvestment Initiative. The committee will focus on developing a statewide policy framework to support local governments in improving recidivism and health outcomes for people who repeatedly cycle through both the public safety and health systems.

Illinois and Montana Hold State Forums on Public Safety

Illinois and Montana Hold State Forums on Public Safety

Illinois and Montana are the latest in a number of states to convene state forums on public safety to continue the conversations begun at the 50-State Summit on Public Safety that took place in November 2017 in Washington, DC.

Vermont’s Statewide Recidivism Reduction Strategy: Highlights and Progress

Vermont’s Statewide Recidivism Reduction Strategy: Highlights and Progress

Following four principles of corrections system improvement—organizational development, use of risk and needs assessments, quality improvement, and data collection and management—states like Vermont participate in SRR in an effort to reduce the likelihood of recidivism for every person under correctional supervision.

Announcements

Apply Now: Justice Reinvestment Initiative Funding Opportunities

Apply Now: Justice Reinvestment Initiative Funding Opportunities

The Bureau of Justice Assistance has announced two FY2018 funding opportunities under the Justice Reinvestment Initiative (JRI). JRI uses criminal justice data to design and implement innovative, research-based, and comprehensive approaches to reduce crime, cut recidivism rates, and shift resources toward more cost-effective safety strategies that work.

Sixteenth National Indian Nations Conference: Justice for Victims of Crime

Sixteenth National Indian Nations Conference: Justice for Victims of Crime

The purpose of the conference is to bring together Native American victims, victim advocates, tribal leaders, victim service providers, community volunteers, prosecutors, judicial and law enforcement personnel, family violence and sexual assault specialists, medical providers, social services and mental health personnel, probation/corrections, criminal justice and juvenile justice personnel, as well as federal and state agency representatives to share their knowledge, experiences, and ideas for developing programs that serve the unique needs of crime victims in Indian Country.

Apply Now: Youth in Custody Practice Model Initiative

Apply Now: Youth in Custody Practice Model Initiative

The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform at Georgetown University’s McCourt School of Public Policy, in partnership with the Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators, is now accepting applications for its 2019 cohort of Youth in Custody Practice Model sites.

WEBINARS

Addressing the Needs of Veterans in the Criminal Justice System

Addressing the Needs of Veterans in the Criminal Justice System

This webinar provides an overview of national estimates of incarcerated veterans; explains components of the Veterans Health Administration’s veterans justice programs; expands awareness of the needs of veterans in the justice system; and discusses new developments in the Veterans Administration and community interventions to provide services to veterans in the justice system.

Best Practices in Screening and Assessment for People with Co-Occurring Substance Use and Mental Health Disorders in the Criminal Justice System

Best Practices in Screening and Assessment for People with Co-Occurring Substance Use and Mental Health Disorders in the Criminal Justice System

This webinar features Roger Peters, PhD, a licensed clinical psychologist and professor in the Department of Mental Health Law and Policy at the Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, University of South Florida. The webinar discusses the prevalence of co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders among people involved in the criminal justice system, as well as effective screening and assessment instruments to use with this population.

Publications

Justice Reinvestment in Ohio: Fourth Presentation

Justice Reinvestment in Ohio: Fourth Presentation

The fourth presentation to the Justice Reinvestment Ad Hoc Committee of the Ohio Criminal Sentencing Commission provides an overview of data and policy options related to reducing violent crime, moving people with substance addictions and mental health needs into treatment that works, reducing recidivism and costs to taxpayers, and improving data collection.

Behavioral Health Justice Reinvestment in Oregon: Overview

Behavioral Health Justice Reinvestment in Oregon: Overview

This publication outlines the scope of a Behavioral Health Justice Reinvestment approach in Oregon to develop a statewide policy framework to help support tribal government, county, and local systems in improving recidivism and health outcomes for the small but important group of people who repeatedly cycle through the public safety and health systems.

RECENT HEADLINES

To Lower Prison Health Costs, Maryland Serves Healthy Food

The women, who have had a say in the new menus, report greater satisfaction. More are coming to the dining hall rather than eating food they buy in the commissary. They say that has improved morale in the prison, which could translate into fewer squabbles and heightened safety.

Freaky Friday, Prison-Style

Now it was time to start ushering into the simulator a 30-member pool of “recently-released prisoners”—played by our prison’s deputy wardens, captains and officers. They all entered the room every bit as clueless as we’d been, dumbstruck at being made to be convicts.

In Prison, Discipline Comes Down Hardest On Women

Women can lose “good conduct credits” that would shorten an inmate’s sentence, causing them to spend more time behind bars. In California, between January 2016 and February 2018, women had the equivalent of 1,483 years added to their sentences through good-credit revocations, and at a higher rate than for male prisoners.