Corrections

California Arrests Study

The unprecedented study answers one question: to what extent do people on probation and parole contribute to crime, as measured by arrests?

Announcements

WEBINARS

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Problem-Solving Clinic on Women’s Risk Needs Assessment

This webinar discussed the Women’s Risk Needs Assessment (WRNA), and provided participants the opportunity to discuss the benefits and challenges of WRNA, best practices for implementing gender-responsive assessments with or without other assessment tools, and resources and recommendations to help address challenges to using WRNA.

Publications

National Institute of Corrections

Desktop Guide for Working with Youth in Confinement

Divided into two parts, this guide first explores the background principles, concepts, and knowledge at the core of juvenile justice and services for youth in confinement, and then highlights quality practice, including the skills needed to effectively serve youth in confinement.

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Improving Recidivism as a Performance Measure

The report from the Urban Institute outlines necessary elements to guide states in defining, collecting, analyzing, and disseminating recidivism data, and sets the stage for the next generation of policy-relevant and action-oriented recidivism research at the state level

Bureau of Justice Statistics

Prisoners in 2013

This report from the Bureau of Justice Statistics presents the final count collected by the National Prisoner Statistics Program of prisoners in state and federal correctional authorities on December 31, 2013.

RECENT HEADLINES

Pipeline to Prison: System Fails Special Ed Students

Each year, thousands of Mississippi teens cycle through the justice system, where experts say the quality of education is often low. Incarcerated juveniles have the same educational rights as those outside — five hours of instruction a day that meet their learning needs, including special education. The state does not currently track how many of those juvenile offenders are entitled to those extra education services, but according to a 2010 federal survey, 30 percent of youth in custody of the juvenile justice system have a diagnosed learning disability — six times the amount in the general population.