Highlights

Colorado Launches Comprehensive Review of Juvenile Justice System

“Kids don’t belong in prison. We know from the data that when children are incarcerated they usually become repeat offenders,” said Governor John Hickenlooper. “This data-driven review will help us provide youths the best chance to successfully transition to a crime-free, productive adulthood.”

Vermont and Ohio Kick Off State Forums on Public Safety

Vermont and Ohio Kick Off State Forums on Public Safety

As a continuation of the 50-State Summit on Public Safety held in November 2017 in Washington, DC, multiple states have been selected by the U.S Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance to host individual state forums on public safety. Earlier this month, Vermont and Ohio became the first states to hold their forums, each of which was facilitated by staff from the CSG Justice Center.

Governors Take Action to Launch National Initiative Promoting Connections with People Closest to Correctional System

Governors Take Action to Launch National Initiative Promoting Connections with People Closest to Correctional System

The initiative—sponsored by the National Reentry Resource Center and The CSG Justice Center in partnership with the Association of State Correctional Administrators, JustLeadershipUSA, and the National Center for Victims of Crime—will launch with a wave of public activities featuring both Republican and Democratic governors and other elected officials meeting with people impacted by the correctional system in their respective states.

Four Tips from Idaho for Overhauling Correctional Programming

Four Tips from Idaho for Overhauling Correctional Programming

For years, Idaho Department of Correction leaders believed they were running a top-notch corrections program. But an evaluation of their programming upended that notion and compelled then Director Kevin Kempf to make some tough choices to bring about change.

PBS Newshour: Breaking the School-To-Prison Pipeline for Young Offenders One Class at a Time

In most states across America, education for teen offenders pales in comparison to what they’d receive on the outside. Just one third mandate that these kids meet the same standards as their public school counterparts. Massachusetts is one of them, and there the goal is to save these young offenders with vocational classes and good old reading, writing and arithmetic.