Recent CSG Justice Center Posts

Reentry Essentials: Addressing Mental Health Needs among People in the Criminal Justice System

Reentry Essentials: Addressing Mental Health Needs among People in the Criminal Justice System

A disproportionate number of people in the nation’s criminal justice system face mental health issues: a Bureau of Justice Statistics report found, for example, that people in U.S. prisons and jails are three to five times more likely to experience serious psychological distress than the general adult population. While there is an overwhelming need to provide effective treatment, challenges exist in quantifying the extent of that need and taking a strategic approach across systems—from law enforcement to community-based reentry services.

Stepping Up Initiative Expands Push for Counties to Collect Data on Number of People in Jails Who Have Mental Illnesses

Stepping Up Initiative Expands Push for Counties to Collect Data on Number of People in Jails Who Have Mental Illnesses

The Stepping Up initiative recently launched a national effort to help counties collect accurate, accessible data on the number of people entering their jails who have mental illnesses. As part of the effort, seven rural and urban “Innovator Counties” have been selected as models for their expertise in accurately identifying these individuals and consistently collecting data on them.

Announcements

Register for Webinar: Understanding Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in People Involved with the Criminal Justice System

Register for Webinar: Understanding Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in People Involved with the Criminal Justice System

In this webinar Leigh Ann Davis, director of the National Center on Criminal Justice & Disability, will discuss the differences and similarities between various kinds of behavioral health diagnoses and intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD), how to identify someone with I/DD, and tips for to work more effectively with people with I/DD in correctional settings.

Addressing the Training Needs of Juvenile Prosecutors

Addressing the Training Needs of Juvenile Prosecutors

Funding under this grant program can be used by states to develop or supplement existing training and/or professional development that is tailored to the unique needs and challenges related to juvenile prosecution.

WEBINARS

PUBLICATIONS

Justice Reinvestment in Wyoming: Overview

Justice Reinvestment in Wyoming: Overview

This publication outlines criminal justice trends in Wyoming—including crime trends, increases in drug arrests, prison population growth and resulting costs, and revocations from probation or parole—and summarizes the stages involved in using a Justice Reinvestment approach to address criminal justice system challenges.

Strategies to Engage Employers in Conversations about Hiring Applicants with Criminal Records

Strategies to Engage Employers in Conversations about Hiring Applicants with Criminal Records

This tip sheet from the National Reentry Resource Center offers suggestions on how organizations and agencies that provide support to people who have criminal records—including parole and probation agencies, reentry service providers, and educational and occupational training programs—can engage employers in conversations about hiring people who have criminal records, which will help improve the employment outcomes of the people they serve.

Justice Reinvestment in Missouri: Policy Framework

Justice Reinvestment in Missouri: Policy Framework

The final report of the CSG Justice Center outlines policy recommendations developed in collaboration with the Missouri Justice Reinvestment Task Force. Among other things, these policies aim to reduce violent crime, increase the availability and effectiveness of community-based treatment for substance addiction and mental illnesses for people in the criminal justice system, and reduce recidivism.

Justice Reinvestment: How States Use Data to Design Innovative Strategies to Reduce Crime, Recidivism, and Costs

Justice Reinvestment: How States Use Data to Design Innovative Strategies to Reduce Crime, Recidivism, and Costs

State policymakers are grappling with upticks in violent crime, the opioid epidemic, people who have mental illnesses in the justice system, high rates of recidivism, and the high cost of corrections, all while trying to improve services for victims and increase opportunities for people returning to communities from jail and prison. To tackle these issues, more than 25 states have partnered with the CSG Justice Center to use a justice reinvestment approach.

JUSTICE CENTER IN THE NEWS

Opinion: Juvenile Justice Systems Need to Transform to Have Lasting Impact on Youth Outcomes

To push the field in this direction, The Council of State Governments Justice Center and the Center for Juvenile Justice Reform at Georgetown University partnered last fall to interview nearly 50 researchers, national experts and system leaders from across the juvenile justice continuum to solicit their ideas about how juvenile justice systems could significantly improve outcomes for youth.

Counties Across the Country Participate in National Stepping Up Day of Action

During this Day of Action, county officials are hosting events or participating in local activities to share with constituents the progress made in addressing the prevalence of people who have mental illnesses in jails; raise public awareness and understanding of this important issue; and emphasize their commitment to creating data-driven, systems-level changes to policy and practice to achieve Stepping Up goals.

Colorado Launches Comprehensive Review of Juvenile Justice System

“Kids don’t belong in prison. We know from the data that when children are incarcerated they usually become repeat offenders,” said Governor John Hickenlooper. “This data-driven review will help us provide youths the best chance to successfully transition to a crime-free, productive adulthood.”

Diversion Program Would Help Keep Mentally Ill Out of Jail

Nonviolent offenders with mental illness could be diverted away from New Jersey’s mainstream criminal justice system and into a rehabilitation program designed to provide treatment for their psychiatric disorder, under an initiative envisioned by a longtime Democratic Senator that also reflects the goals of a growing national movement.