Recent Posts

‘Washington Post’ Criminal Justice Summit Considers Opportunities for Reform

‘Washington Post’ Criminal Justice Summit Considers Opportunities for Reform

As someone who was once incarcerated, Khalil Cumberbatch knows that the things many people miss while behind bars may not be what one might expect. “Many people that I’ve met in maximum security prisons want to … be involved with their community; they want to be taxpayers; they want to be able to drop their kids off and pick them up from school,” he said at the Washington Post’s Criminal Justice Summit in Washington, DC, this month. “Second chances matter.”

Understanding the FBI Crime Report

Understanding the FBI Crime Report

Recently, the FBI released its annual report on crime, which included distressing news: violent crime—while still at levels far below what it was 20 years ago—increased between 2014 and 2015. Whenever elected officials see anything indicating their constituents are less safe, they are understandably and appropriately anxious.

The Continuing Leverage of Releasing Authorities: Findings from a National Survey

The Continuing Leverage of Releasing Authorities: Findings from a National Survey

This report, a compilation of a national survey of state parole boards and the U.S. Parole Commission, is a resource for parole and correctional authorities, policymakers, and other criminal justice system stakeholders who are interested in seeing how parole boards across the country compare with one another.

HUD Publication Outlines Promising Reentry Housing Models

HUD Publication Outlines Promising Reentry Housing Models

It Starts With Housing is a new publication from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) that encourages public housing authorities to collaborate with partners to “make second chances real for the men and women returning” from jail and prison.

Announcements

Apply Now: Research Network on Misdemeanor Justice

Apply Now: Research Network on Misdemeanor Justice

The Research Network on Misdemeanor Justice, a John Jay College of Criminal Justice project funded by the Laura and John Arnold Foundation, is convening various criminal justice agencies to work with research institutions across seven jurisdictions to analyze trends related to low-level offenses such as misdemeanors and summonses/citations. Applications are due October 15.

WEBINARS

Developing Program Phases in a Mental Health Court

Developing Program Phases in a Mental Health Court

As jurisdictions refine their practices within mental health courts they often seek additional information on using a phased approach as a way to structure program participation. How are program phases created? What makes them effective? How many program phases should a mental health court have? This webinar focusses on answering these questions and others.

Developing Sustainability, Success Stories from the Field

Developing Sustainability, Success Stories from the Field

Grant funding often provides seed money to help agencies launch new programs. However, once the grant has expended, finding additional funds to sustain a program can be challenging. This webinar discusses how other funding streams can be leveraged, and partnerships developed, to help sustain a program.

Keeping Fathers Engaged in Reentry Programs Post-Release

Keeping Fathers Engaged in Reentry Programs Post-Release

This webinar discusses the challenge of keeping participants engaged in fatherhood reentry programs after they have been released from incarceration and examines some techniques and strategies that have been employed by different programs.

Medication Assisted Treatment in Jails and Community-Based Settings

Medication Assisted Treatment in Jails and Community-Based Settings

This webinar is designed for Justice and Mental Health Collaboration Program and Second Chance Act Reentry Program for Adults with Co-occurring Substance Use and Mental Disorders grantees and features speakers from three different grant programs that are utilizing MAT in jail and community-based settings for people involved in the justice system.

PUBLICATIONS

Justice Reinvestment in North Dakota: Policy Framework

Justice Reinvestment in North Dakota: Policy Framework

The Justice Reinvestment Policy Framework presented to the Incarceration Issues Committee offers four pragmatic policy options that are projected to reduce the forecasted prison population in 2022 by 13 percent, avoiding $36.3 million in contract prison bed costs.

Justice Reinvestment in Pennsylvania: Fourth Presentation

Justice Reinvestment in Pennsylvania: Fourth Presentation

The fourth presentation to the Pennsylvania Justice Reinvestment Initiative Working Group focuses on prioritizing recidivism reduction and understanding sentencing choices and outcomes as well as potential policy options.

JUSTICE CENTER IN THE NEWS

Prison Rehabilitation Program Gets an Overhaul

As a part of a revamping of the all Department of Correction facilities, the rider program had new curricula added. A rider is served at an intensive rehabilitation facility where offenders enter treatment with the hope of diverting them from recidivism.

Criminal Justice Panel Working Toward Year-End Policy Debate

After months studying recidivism trends, drivers of incarceration and other elements of criminal justice in Massachusetts, researchers from the Council on State Governments Justice Center plan to gather with a 25-member working group in December to go over final policy recommendations.

We Can’t Arrest Our Way out of Pa.’s Heroin Epidemic: Josh Shapiro

As Chairman of the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency and more recently as a candidate for Attorney General, I’ve traveled to every corner of our Commonwealth and seen how the heroin and opioid epidemic is gripping communities – urban, suburban and rural alike – as the number one accidental killer in Pennsylvania.

When a Policy Alone Is Not Enough

In his first eight sessions as a member of the Oklahoma House of Representatives, Kris Steele paid scant attention to crime and punishment. But, in 2008, Steele’s work on the state budget put Oklahoma’s prison system in his sights for the first time. What he saw, he says, “puzzled and dismayed” him.