Partner With Us

In addition to federal partnerships that fund our work in jurisdictions across the country, the CSG Justice Center often contracts directly with various states, counties, and tribal communities to help analyze and improve elements of their criminal justice systems. Below are several ways our experts can work directly with your state or community

Justice Program Assessment

State and local governments spend hundreds of millions of dollars every year on recidivism-reduction programs for people in the criminal justice system. But these programs are only effective if they target the right people, use practices rooted in the latest research, and are regularly evaluated to ensure quality. Through the Justice Program Assessment, a tailored review conducted by our team of experts, the CSG Justice Center can help agencies answer critical questions and create a roadmap to improving their programs.

How can the CSG Justice Center help?

The Justice Program Assessment (JPA) is a tailored review conducted by experts on our staff to help your agency answer three core questions about its programs:

  1. Are the programs targeting people who are most likely to reoffend?
  2. Do they incorporate evidence-based practices?
  3. How well are they performing?

Getting Results

The results of the assessment will create a roadmap for your agency to help:

  • Streamline processes;
  • Adjust which people are prioritized for programming;
  • Deliver the most effective programs; and
  • Develop quality improvement processes to keep programs on track.

Snapshot: JPA in Idaho

In 2015, Idaho Department of Corrections used the JPA to examine the nearly $10 million spent annually on programming to see if changes could be made. Since receiving the JPA results, the department

  • Now offers five core evidence-based programs in all facilities, allowing people to access programs regardless of housing location;
  • Has administered 45 trainings to about 1,000 staff members on evidence-based programs; and
  • According to recent audits conducted by the state, program quality now exceeds national averages.
Improving How States Help Victims of Crime

States often struggle to identify and address the full range of crime victims’ needs in a consistent, timely, and compassionate manner. However, states have three primary ways to assist survivors: managing restitution, compensating victims for certain expenses, and funding services through state and federal grants. Experts from the CSG Justice Center can employ a data-intensive approach to help states develop short- and long-term strategies to improve any or all of these mechanisms for assisting victims.

  • Managing restitution
  • Compensating victims for certain expenses
  • Funding services through state and federal grants

How can the CSG Justice Center help?

Using the following steps, experts from the CSG Justice Center employ a data-intensive approach to help states develop short- and long-term strategies to improve any or all of these mechanisms for assisting victims.

 

Review Data
  • Review restitution data and collect input from stakeholders.
  • Review compensation data, statutes, rules, and policies to identify how the program can be strengthened.
  • Review internal policies and practices related to administration of funds; use data to inform resource allocation and expansion of services.
Develop Solutions
  • Craft policy solutions to improve restitution management.
  • Develop policy solutions to improve the management of the program.
  • Improve the quality and consistency of victim services data so that states can accurately report on how funds are used.
Access Results
  • Measure the effects of policy solutions on victims and people who owe.
  • Measure the impact of policy solutions on people who are eligible for compensation.
  • Assess the quality of victim service infrastructure to strengthen the network of services.

 

Improving County Justice and Behavioral Health Systems

The number of people who have mental illnesses in U.S. jails has reached crisis levels, and many have become de facto mental health care facilities. But often, counties struggle to collect adequate data on the number of people who have mental illnesses in their jails or to use it to drive change. Our team uses a unique approach to develop tailored, data-driven plans to help reduce the prevalence of mental illnesses in their jails.