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Obama Supports ‘Second Chances’ for People Convicted of Nonviolent Offenses

Obama Supports ‘Second Chances’ for People Convicted of Nonviolent Offenses

After commuting the sentences of 46 people convicted of nonviolent drug crimes earlier in the week, President Barack Obama said in a major speech on July 14 at the NAACP that it was time to reduce sentences for people convicted of nonviolent crimes generally and to invest in helping formerly incarcerated people reenter society.

Q&A with Julian Adler of the Red Hook Community Justice Center

Q&A with Julian Adler of the Red Hook Community Justice Center

As the nation’s first multijurisdictional community court, the Red Hook Community Justice Center in Brooklyn has served as a neighborhood hub for clinical services, community service, youth programs, and other social supports since its founding in 2000.

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Mental Health Screening in Juvenile Justice Services

Mental Health Screening in Juvenile Justice Services

Using results from a 51-jurisdiction survey, this brief from the National Center for Juvenile Justice provides an overview of standardized mental health screening tools that are required at the state-level in juvenile detention, probation, and correction settings.

Advancing School Discipline Reform

Advancing School Discipline Reform

This report from the National Association of State Boards of Education explores the latest research on punitive school discipline and zero-tolerance policies, their effects on student achievement and engagement, and a range of more effective disciplinary strategies.

“Youth Justice Awareness Month” Event Planning Guide

“Youth Justice Awareness Month” Event Planning Guide

This guide from the Campaign for Youth Justice provides tips on how to plan an event for National Youth Justice Awareness Month, which is held every October to raise awareness of the consequences of youth prosecution and placement in the adult criminal justice system.

The Sexual Abuse to Prison Pipeline: The Girls’ Story

The Sexual Abuse to Prison Pipeline: The Girls’ Story

The report examines the sexual abuse to prison pipeline for girls, a phenomenon in which sexual abuse experienced by girls is one of the primary predictors of their involvement with the juvenile justice system.

Recent headlines

Analysis Finds Higher Expulsion Rates for Black Students

With the Obama administration focused on reducing the number of suspensions, expulsions and arrests in public schools, a new analysis of federal data identifies districts in 13 Southern states where black students are suspended or expelled at rates overwhelmingly higher than white children.

Locked in Solitary at 14: Adult Jails Isolate Youths Despite Risk

Solitary confinement is increasingly being questioned — by mental health officials, criminologists and, most recently, President Obama. Experts say its effects on juveniles can be particularly damaging because their minds and bodies are still developing, putting them at greater risk of psychological harm and leading to depression and other mental health problems.

Four Activities for Building a Positive School Climate

The Greater Good Science Center’s new website, Greater Good in Action, offers many research-based practices that can easily be adapted to create a safe and supportive school culture. Here are a few examples.

Christie Signs Bills Setting Overhauls for Imprisoned Youth

Governor Christie has made reforming the criminal justice system a plank of his campaign for the White House, and on Monday signed into law a set of overhauls for imprisoned youth in New Jersey, including how long they may be kept in solitary confinement.

White Kids Get Medicated When They Misbehave, Black Kids Get Suspended — or Arrested

Black students made up just 18 percent of students in the public schools sampled by the New York Times in 2012, but “they accounted for 35 percent of those suspended once” and 39 percent of those expelled — examining federal data, the Times also noted that “nationwide, more than 70 percent of students involved in arrests or referrals to court are black or Hispanic.”