Reentry

NRRC program logoThe National Reentry Resource Center provides education, training, and technical assistance to states, tribes, territories, local governments, service providers, non-profit organizations, and corrections institutions working on prisoner reentry. Learn more...

Visit the What Works in Reentry Clearinghouse

Recent Posts

Obama Supports ‘Second Chances’ for People Convicted of Nonviolent Offenses

Obama Supports ‘Second Chances’ for People Convicted of Nonviolent Offenses

After commuting the sentences of 46 people convicted of nonviolent drug crimes earlier in the week, President Barack Obama said in a major speech on July 14 at the NAACP that it was time to reduce sentences for people convicted of nonviolent crimes generally and to invest in helping formerly incarcerated people reenter society.

Southern States Discuss Challenges and Opportunities Related to Hiring Adults with Criminal Records

Southern States Discuss Challenges and Opportunities Related to Hiring Adults with Criminal Records

An estimated 70 million people in the U.S. have a criminal record, and the South is the region with the highest incarceration rates per capita. Research shows that having a steady job can significantly increase the likelihood of success for someone returning home from prison, but oftentimes such individuals can’t get jobs, not necessarily because they’re underqualified, but because employers are wary of hiring people who have criminal histories.

South Carolina Business, Community, and Corrections Leaders Gather in Greenville to Discuss Employing People with Criminal Records

South Carolina Business, Community, and Corrections Leaders Gather in Greenville to Discuss Employing People with Criminal Records

Understanding the importance of employment in reentry success, the Greenville Chamber of Commerce and the Greenville Reentry Task Force recently invited more than 30 employers, as well as a number of community leaders, policymakers, and corrections officials, to breakfast at The Commerce Club, where they talked about the obstacles to hiring people with criminal records and also the best ways to overcome those barriers.

Announcements

Improved Reentry Education Opportunity Demonstration Grant Program

Improved Reentry Education Opportunity Demonstration Grant Program

The purpose of this program is to support demonstration projects that show the impact and effectiveness of reentry education for incarcerated individuals. The program seeks to demonstrate that high-quality, appropriately designed, well-integrated, and well-implemented educational services provided in institutional and community settings are critical in supporting educational attainment and reentry success for individuals who are involved with the justice system.

Webinars

Responding to the Second Chance Act Technology-Based Career Training Program

Responding to the Second Chance Act Technology-Based Career Training Program

In this webinar, officials from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance explain the grant program and application process. These grants will provide up to $750,000 to states, units of local government, territories, and federally recognized Indian tribes for a 36-month project period. The goal of this program is to increase the post-release employability of individuals through technology-based career training.

Risk Need Responsivity 101: A Primer for SCA and JMHCP Grant Recipients

Risk Need Responsivity 101: A Primer for SCA and JMHCP Grant Recipients

This webinar provides foundational knowledge on RNR as well as guidance on understanding and implementing risk assessment tools as a way to direct resources and support recidivism-reduction strategies for criminal justice and social service agencies, practitioners, and policymakers.

Publications

Recent headlines

Federal Prisons Could Release 1,000 Times More Drug Offenders Than Obama Did

There is much buzz when President Obama commuted the sentences of 46 nonviolent federal drug offenders last week, whose “punishments didn’t fit the crime.” However, a lesser-known policy change, enacted in 2014 with far less fanfare will affect 1,000 times the number of people as Obama’s commutations. Colloquially known as “drugs minus two,” the amendment to the U.S. Sentencing Commission’s guidelines could reduce the sentences of as many as 46,000 people.

Dare County Gets Behind National Mental Health Initiative

Joining a growing effort to tackle what one official calls “a national crisis,” the Dare County Board of Commissioners unanimously approved a resolution on July 20 to reduce the number of inmates with mental illness in the county jail. The board’s action came only days after North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory’s July 14 announcement that he was creating the North Carolina Mental Health and Substance Use Task Force in support of the national “Stepping Up” initiative on mental illness and incarceration.

“These People Need to Know What We Have Gone Through”

The program, Bridges to Life, attempts to awake in prisoners a sense of empathy for and accountability to their victims. Once equipped with those basic skills, so the thinking goes, they will be more likely to care enough about themselves and others to live more responsibly once they’re released from prison.

Fewer Released Felons Returning to California Prisons

Fewer felons released from state prison are returning because of committing new crimes or having their paroles revoked, a new report from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation says. he CDCR report adds new information to an ongoing political debate over the effects of “realignment,” the 2011 program to reduce prison inmates by shifting felons deemed to be non-dangerous to local jails and probation programs.

Obama, in Oklahoma, Takes Reform Message to the Prison Cell Block

Mr. Obama came here to showcase a bid to overhaul America’s criminal justice system in a way none of his predecessors have tried to do, at least not in modern times. Where other presidents worked to make life harder for criminals, Mr. Obama wants to make their conditions better.

You Just Got Out of Prison. Now What?

This story and short Op-Doc profiles a former prisoner who guides men released from life sentences in California through their first hours of freedom.

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch Calls for Justice Reforms

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch called for reforms to America’s criminal justice system and for the nation to push beyond the “cycle of criminality and incarceration” as a way to move forward for justice and civil rights.