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Recent Posts

Vermont’s Statewide Recidivism Reduction Strategy: Highlights and Progress

Vermont’s Statewide Recidivism Reduction Strategy: Highlights and Progress

Following four principles of corrections system improvement—organizational development, use of risk and needs assessments, quality improvement, and data collection and management—states like Vermont participate in SRR in an effort to reduce the likelihood of recidivism for every person under correctional supervision.

Groundbreaking 50-State Report on Public Safety Updated with 2017 Data

Groundbreaking 50-State Report on Public Safety Updated with 2017 Data

The CSG Justice Center has released an updated version of the 50-State Report on Public Safety that includes 2017 crime and arrest data. The report is a web-based resource that combines extensive data analyses, case studies and recommended strategies from all 50 states to help policymakers address their state’s specific public safety challenges.

North Dakota Explores Expanding Alternatives to Incarceration and Behavioral Health Services for People in the Criminal Justice System

North Dakota Explores Expanding Alternatives to Incarceration and Behavioral Health Services for People in the Criminal Justice System

At a recent North Dakota Justice Reinvestment Oversight Committee meeting, CSG Justice Center staff highlighted recent decreases in prison admissions that resulted from alcohol and drug offenses and probation revocations. These declines seem to be the cause of a 6.5-percent drop in the state’s total prison population in FY2018, which exceeded expectations, and have reinforced the state’s efforts to increase behavioral health services for people in the criminal justice system.

Announcements

What Works in Reentry Seminar and Livestream

What Works in Reentry Seminar and Livestream

The National Institute of Justice What Works in Reentry seminar and livestream will focus on the role and importance of institutional and community corrections, and rehabilitative and reentry services in crime prevention and public safety efforts.

Webinars

Best and Promising Practices in Integrating Reentry and Employment Interventions

Best and Promising Practices in Integrating Reentry and Employment Interventions

This webinar is based on lessons learned from integrating reentry and employment interventions to help people returning home after incarceration find and keep employment. The presentation is especially useful for corrections, reentry, and workforce development administrators and practitioners that are interested in maximizing scarce resources and improving recidivism and employment outcomes.

Publications

Reimagining Prison Web Report

Reimagining Prison Web Report

This report asserts a reconsideration of the function of incarceration in the United States, which stems from research conducted in a small unit for young adults in a Connecticut maximum-security facility, contrasted with prisons in Germany, where the conditions and operations of the prison system are defined by a commitment to uphold human dignity.

Repairing the Road to Redemption in California

Repairing the Road to Redemption in California

Californians for Safety and Justice (CSJ) convened a group of leading experts to develop a first-of-its-kind study on the impact of collateral consequences and the opportunity to advance solutions that will eliminate barriers to success and offer real second chances to millions of Californians.

Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Program Resource Center

Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Program Resource Center

This resource center is an online clearinghouse of information, training, and other resources that support a variety of state, local, and tribal users, including BJA COAP grantees, policymakers, partner agencies and associations, peer recovery coaches, and families affected by the nationwide opioid epidemic.

Recent headlines

Could an Ex-Convict Become an Attorney? I Intended to Find Out

Under Connecticut law, felons are presumed to lack the character and fitness required to practice law unless they can prove otherwise. I might eventually be allowed to practice law, or, I realized with a cold, dull clarity, I might not.

More Women Are behind Bars Now: One Prison Wants to Change That

Connecticut is trying to push back by focusing on one group that is especially likely to return to prison: young women, ages 18 to 25. It began in the summer of 2015, when Scott Semple, who runs the Connecticut state prison system, spent a week visiting prisons in Germany.

Bringing Arts and Culture into the Work of Public Safety and Criminal Justice

In 2014, as the People’s Paper Co-op was beginning, artists and activists Courtney Bowles and Mark Strandquist began working with community members at the Village of Arts and Humanities to discuss the causes, impacts, and potential solutions “to the collateral consequences of criminal records,” says Strandquist.

Milwaukee Nonprofit Offers Ex-Offenders Support, Resources

The Milwaukee Reentry Council’s goal is to reduce recidivism by 50 percent within the next five years. The program is focusing on Milwaukee neighborhoods with high rates of re-offending, mostly on the North Side.

Opinion: The Prison ‘Old-Timers’ Who Gave Me Life

“We have so much to offer,” 62-year-old Mark Thompson told me, referring to the many reformed old-timers behind the wall. “It makes more sense helping younger guys understand their anger and addiction out there,” he said, “than dealing with it in here.”

Butler County Honoring Those Who Help Mentally Ill, Addicts

Rhonda Benson, executive director of the Butler County chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, said each honoree epitomizes the purpose of the Stepping Up Initiative, which is to provide services and help for the mentally ill rather than having them repeatedly jailed.