Reentry

NRRC program logoThe National Reentry Resource Center provides education, training, and technical assistance to states, tribes, territories, local governments, service providers, non-profit organizations, and corrections institutions working on prisoner reentry. Learn more...

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Recent Posts

RIDGE Project Among Grantees at NRRC Intensive Training Summit

RIDGE Project Among Grantees at NRRC Intensive Training Summit

The RIDGE Project is today divided into an adult division, a workforce development division, and a youth division. The adult programming begins inside the prison; fathers whose children are younger than 22 and who are within six months from release are eligible.

Obama Supports ‘Second Chances’ for People Convicted of Nonviolent Offenses

Obama Supports ‘Second Chances’ for People Convicted of Nonviolent Offenses

After commuting the sentences of 46 people convicted of nonviolent drug crimes earlier in the week, President Barack Obama said in a major speech on July 14 at the NAACP that it was time to reduce sentences for people convicted of nonviolent crimes generally and to invest in helping formerly incarcerated people reenter society.

Southern States Discuss Challenges and Opportunities Related to Hiring Adults with Criminal Records

Southern States Discuss Challenges and Opportunities Related to Hiring Adults with Criminal Records

An estimated 70 million people in the U.S. have a criminal record, and the South is the region with the highest incarceration rates per capita. Research shows that having a steady job can significantly increase the likelihood of success for someone returning home from prison, but oftentimes such individuals can’t get jobs, not necessarily because they’re underqualified, but because employers are wary of hiring people who have criminal histories.

South Carolina Business, Community, and Corrections Leaders Gather in Greenville to Discuss Employing People with Criminal Records

South Carolina Business, Community, and Corrections Leaders Gather in Greenville to Discuss Employing People with Criminal Records

Understanding the importance of employment in reentry success, the Greenville Chamber of Commerce and the Greenville Reentry Task Force recently invited more than 30 employers, as well as a number of community leaders, policymakers, and corrections officials, to breakfast at The Commerce Club, where they talked about the obstacles to hiring people with criminal records and also the best ways to overcome those barriers.

Announcements

Reentry Conference and Resource Fair

Reentry Conference and Resource Fair

Hosted by the Archdiocese of San Francisco’s Office of Public Policy and Social Concerns, this conference will discuss the challenges that individuals returning home from incarceration face, as well as the best practices to address these challenges. It will also feature nonprofits and agencies that are working to support individuals returning home from incarceration.

Webinars

Social Media in Community Supervision: Promising Practices for Policy and Implementation

Social Media in Community Supervision: Promising Practices for Policy and Implementation

This webinar shares emerging research regarding the importance of establishing policies around the use of social media by community corrections administrators, managers and supervisors including the administration of social media content; setting expectations for appropriate employee personal use; and investigation and supervision standards.

Responding to the Second Chance Act Technology-Based Career Training Program

Responding to the Second Chance Act Technology-Based Career Training Program

In this webinar, officials from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance explain the grant program and application process. These grants will provide up to $750,000 to states, units of local government, territories, and federally recognized Indian tribes for a 36-month project period. The goal of this program is to increase the post-release employability of individuals through technology-based career training.

Risk Need Responsivity 101: A Primer for SCA and JMHCP Grant Recipients

Risk Need Responsivity 101: A Primer for SCA and JMHCP Grant Recipients

This webinar provides foundational knowledge on RNR as well as guidance on understanding and implementing risk assessment tools as a way to direct resources and support recidivism-reduction strategies for criminal justice and social service agencies, practitioners, and policymakers.

Publications

The Prison Population Forecaster

The Prison Population Forecaster

Cutting drug admissions in half will reduce the prison by 7 percent—or 33,000—by the end of 2021, according to a new tool developed by researchers at the Urban Institute.

Mental Health Screening in Juvenile Justice Services

Mental Health Screening in Juvenile Justice Services

Using results from a 51-jurisdiction survey, this brief from the National Center for Juvenile Justice provides an overview of standardized mental health screening tools that are required at the state-level in juvenile detention, probation, and correction settings.

Recent headlines

Five Bottom Line Reasons Why Employers Should Hire Ex-Felons

Those who pay their debt to society and emerge from prison with a new perspective and lease on life deserve an opportunity to earn a living. They represent a class of prospective employees unlike any other. But, why should employers assume the risk of hiring ex-felons? You may be surprised by these five fact-based, bottom line reasons.

NY Prison Education Programs Team Up to Streamline College Degrees

The education programs that serve New York’s prison population are streamlining the path to a college degree. Private organizations offer college classes in 19 state facilities. Now several of the groups have formed a consortium to help students make it to graduation day.

Locked in Solitary at 14: Adult Jails Isolate Youths Despite Risk

Solitary confinement is increasingly being questioned — by mental health officials, criminologists and, most recently, President Obama. Experts say its effects on juveniles can be particularly damaging because their minds and bodies are still developing, putting them at greater risk of psychological harm and leading to depression and other mental health problems.

A Fair Chance for Ex-Offenders

Nationwide, there has been an increased focus on keeping people out of jail and prison through initiatives like rehabilitation programs, pre-trial diversion and revised sentencing guidelines. However, authorities say it’s equally important to discourage the 2.2 million U.S. citizens who are already behind bars from re-offending by ensuring they can earn a living after being released.

New Approach to Housing Santa Clara County Homeless

In what’s being called the first program of its kind in the state, Santa Clara County is partnering with a housing nonprofit and private organizations to get 150 to 200 chronically homeless folks off the street — and will only pay for the effort if it succeeds. Many of the individuals that the program targets have had contact with the criminal justice system and/or have two or three significant disabilities—mental health, physical disabilities, drug and alcohol addiction, veterans with PTSD,and more.

The Bail Trap

Every year, thousands of innocent people are sent to jail only because they can’t afford to post bail, putting them at risk of losing their jobs, custody of their children — even their lives.

A Second Chance Offers Powerful Possibilities

Investing in correctional education holds the potential for positive ripple effects. For example, it benefits communities by increasing ex-offenders’ earning potential and likelihood of civic participation, both of which will contribute to stimulating the local economy and improving housing conditions.

L.A. County to Relocate Some Inmates, Build Jail to Treat the Mentally Ill

Setting a future course for the troubled Los Angeles County jail system, the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday approved a plan to move at least 1,000 mentally ill offenders out of lockups and voted to build a state-of-the-art jail focused on mental health treatment. The moves come in response to a growing debate about how the county incarcerates its inmates — particularly the mentally ill, who make up 20% of the roughly 17,000 people behind bars.