Second Chance Act Statewide Recidivism Reduction Program

This program helps executive-branch policymakers and state corrections departments plan and implement systemwide reforms aimed at reducing recidivism.

Recent Posts

Second Chance Month Q&A: Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson

Second Chance Month Q&A: Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson

For people who have been convicted of a crime, a second chance can mean greater opportunity for a productive life. As governor, I’ve made a priority of exploring ways that we give the people inside our prisons and jails a bona fide second chance by preparing them for life before they leave prison.

New Mexico Justice Reinvestment Victims Legislation Signed into Law

New Mexico Justice Reinvestment Victims Legislation Signed into Law

Under the new law, eligibility for victim compensation will be expanded to include victims who confide in a licensed medical or mental health care provider (including a tribal care provider) about the crime. Before, eligibility was limited only to victims who reported the crime to law enforcement within 30 days.

Second Chance Month Q&A: Ohio Governor Mike DeWine

Second Chance Month Q&A: Ohio Governor Mike DeWine

“Every citizen in the state benefits when a person comes out of prison as a healthy and productive member of society. The truth is this: the vast majority of people who are currently incarcerated in our state will be released back to their community at some point.”

Second Chance Month Q&A: North Dakota Governor Doug Burgum

Second Chance Month Q&A: North Dakota Governor Doug Burgum

“People released from the criminal justice system become our neighbors when they reenter our communities, and it’s in everyone’s best interest that they are well-positioned to become productive members of the community with dignity and opportunities to succeed.”

Second Chance Month Q&A: Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont

Second Chance Month Q&A: Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont

“As a new governor, I have great respect for the innovative work that past Connecticut leaders have done to reduce our prison population and prepare people for their return to the community—all while driving crime down. But we have to build on that success. There’s far more work to be done to ensure that Connecticut is as safe and successful as possible.”

Announcements

[Apply Now] Tribal-Researcher Capacity Building Grants

[Apply Now] Tribal-Researcher Capacity Building Grants

The program aims to build an increased capability to conduct rigorous research and evaluation projects in Indian country and Alaska Native villages through promotion of engagement between researchers and tribal nations.

[Apply Now] Research into Desistance from Crime Program

[Apply Now] Research into Desistance from Crime Program

Applicants are encouraged to submit proposals for innovative approaches to advance the field’s conceptualization of desistance, novel ways of understanding the processes underlying desistance from crime, and integrating desistance into criminal justice practice and policy.

WEBINARS

Addressing the Needs of Veterans in the Criminal Justice System

Addressing the Needs of Veterans in the Criminal Justice System

This webinar provides an overview of national estimates of incarcerated veterans; explains components of the Veterans Health Administration’s veterans justice programs; expands awareness of the needs of veterans in the justice system; and discusses new developments in the Veterans Administration and community interventions to provide services to veterans in the justice system.

Best Practices in Screening and Assessment for People with Co-Occurring Substance Use and Mental Health Disorders in the Criminal Justice System

Best Practices in Screening and Assessment for People with Co-Occurring Substance Use and Mental Health Disorders in the Criminal Justice System

This webinar features Roger Peters, PhD, a licensed clinical psychologist and professor in the Department of Mental Health Law and Policy at the Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, University of South Florida. The webinar discusses the prevalence of co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders among people involved in the criminal justice system, as well as effective screening and assessment instruments to use with this population.

Publications

JRI State Summaries

JRI State Summaries

Summaries for Georgia, North Carolina, and South Dakota are now available, and additional summaries will be published through September 2020.

Promoting Reentry Success through Increased Access to Social Security Benefits

Promoting Reentry Success through Increased Access to Social Security Benefits

This publication examines how jails across the United States are implementing the Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Insurance Outreach, Access, and Recovery (SOAR) model, which is designed to help people who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness and have a serious mental illness with access to Social Security Administration disability benefits.

Managing the Seriously Mentally Ill in Corrections

Managing the Seriously Mentally Ill in Corrections

This report examines how a disproportionate number of individuals with serious mental illness become involved in the criminal justice system and identifies needs that represent a strong and diverse agenda that can serve as a foundation for transformational change.

RECENT HEADLINES

New Program to Help Recidivism Rate and Help Inmates

The Montgomery County Jail’s new program to help reduce recidivism is well underway and jail administrators like what they see so far. “We’ve seen some good results,” Jail Commander Lonnie Jones said. “The men have good attitudes and have been real anxious to be involved in this program.”

Training and Re-Entry Program Established for Ky. Inmates

Education and Workforce Development, Labor, and Justice and Public Safety Cabinet officials along with leadership from Barren County, the Kentucky Department of Corrections and representatives of Johnson Controls will launch a training reentry program for inmates at the Barren County Corrections Center.

The Surprising Benefits of Serving Prisoners Better Food

Corrections facilities often cut corners on food in an effort to save money. But this may cost taxpayers more in the long run. According to a 2017 analysis by the Prison Policy Initiative, after staffing, health care is the public prison system’s largest expense, setting government agencies back $12.3 billion a year.