Police-Mental Health Collaboration Program Checklists

These checklists can help law enforcement, behavior health, and local leaders determine whether their Police-Mental Health Collaboration programs align with promising practices for improving outcomes for law enforcement encounters with people with mental illnesses or who are in mental health crisis.

Recent Posts

Baltimore County to Further Improve Crisis Response System Based on Independent Assessment

Baltimore County to Further Improve Crisis Response System Based on Independent Assessment

The Baltimore County, Maryland, county executive recently released a report that provides recommendations for the county to better position its police-mental health collaboration (PMHC), the Baltimore County Crisis Response System, to provide an effective and comprehensive response that is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and maximizes both public safety and health outcomes.

Announcements

Apply Now: FY 2019 Thinking For A Change Facilitator Training

Apply Now: FY 2019 Thinking For A Change Facilitator Training

The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is offering training to criminal justice professionals and government contractors. The NIC will provide qualified facilitator trainers at no cost while the host agency provides the training facility and instructional support.

Webinars

How Correctional Agencies Can Develop and Implement Collaborative Comprehensive Case Plans

How Correctional Agencies Can Develop and Implement Collaborative Comprehensive Case Plans

The webinar provides a conceptual overview of the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office reentry program in Greenfield, Massachusetts, and discusses the program’s processes in three key areas: 1) interagency collaboration and information sharing; 2) staff training; and 3) screening and assessment as part of their collaborative comprehensive case plan process.

2017 JMHCP Category 2 Law Enforcement Planning Grantee Orientation

In this webinar, CSG Justice Center staff explain the training and technical assistance opportunities and resources that are available to Justice and Mental Health Collaboration law enforcement grantees. Staff from the Bureau of Justice Assistance also provide an overview of the post-award grand management requirements.

Publications

Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Program Resource Center

Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Program Resource Center

This resource center is an online clearinghouse of information, training, and other resources that support a variety of state, local, and tribal users, including BJA COAP grantees, policymakers, partner agencies and associations, peer recovery coaches, and families affected by the nationwide opioid epidemic.

Responding to Persons Experiencing a Mental Health Crisis

Responding to Persons Experiencing a Mental Health Crisis

This series of publications from the International Association of Chiefs of Police offers guidelines for law enforcement officers when responding to situations involving people reasonably believed to be in crisis.

Recent Headlines

U.S. Surgeon General Calls for Education, Awareness to Combat Opioid Crisis

U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams, who holds the rank of vice admiral in the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, said he and other health care professionals were once “part of the problem” by overprescribing opioids as painkillers, but now he’s “excited to be part of the solution.”

‘Stepping Up’ for Recovery

Miami County is already trying to do a lot of things recommended by the Stepping Up program, pointing to the partnership between the Sheriff’s Office, the Tri-County Board of Recovery and Mental Health Services, and the Miami County Recovery Council.

New Allentown Program Looks at Violence like a Disease That Can Be Treated

“Every act of violence is precipitated by another act of violence,” said Hasshan Batts, the director of operations for Promise Neighborhoods of the Lehigh Valley. “So if someone is a survivor of a violent act, we would like to talk to them. We want to have crisis workers available 24-7.”

LEADing the Way: Jail Diversion Program Aims to Address Opioid Crisis

Realizing they can’t arrest their way out of the opioid epidemic, the Waynesville Police Department has partnered with other agencies to find new solutions to address these problems. Det. Paige Shell traveled to Seattle two years ago to learn about an innovative program called LEAD (Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion) that has been successfully implemented by law enforcement to address drug crime and recidivism.