Police-Mental Health Collaboration Program Checklists

These checklists can help law enforcement, behavior health, and local leaders determine whether their Police-Mental Health Collaboration programs align with promising practices for improving outcomes for law enforcement encounters with people with mental illnesses or who are in mental health crisis.

Recent Posts

Baltimore County to Further Improve Crisis Response System Based on Independent Assessment

Baltimore County to Further Improve Crisis Response System Based on Independent Assessment

The Baltimore County, Maryland, county executive recently released a report that provides recommendations for the county to better position its police-mental health collaboration (PMHC), the Baltimore County Crisis Response System, to provide an effective and comprehensive response that is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and maximizes both public safety and health outcomes.

Announcements

Webinars

How Correctional Agencies Can Develop and Implement Collaborative Comprehensive Case Plans

How Correctional Agencies Can Develop and Implement Collaborative Comprehensive Case Plans

The webinar provides a conceptual overview of the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office reentry program in Greenfield, Massachusetts, and discusses the program’s processes in three key areas: 1) interagency collaboration and information sharing; 2) staff training; and 3) screening and assessment as part of their collaborative comprehensive case plan process.

2017 JMHCP Category 2 Law Enforcement Planning Grantee Orientation

In this webinar, CSG Justice Center staff explain the training and technical assistance opportunities and resources that are available to Justice and Mental Health Collaboration law enforcement grantees. Staff from the Bureau of Justice Assistance also provide an overview of the post-award grand management requirements.

Publications

Responding to Persons Experiencing a Mental Health Crisis

Responding to Persons Experiencing a Mental Health Crisis

This series of publications from the International Association of Chiefs of Police offers guidelines for law enforcement officers when responding to situations involving people reasonably believed to be in crisis.

Critical Issues in Policing Series: The Police Response to Homelessness

Critical Issues in Policing Series: The Police Response to Homelessness

This publication from the Police Executive Research Forum includes information on problem-solving, innovation, and partnerships in the police response to homelessness, and is built upon stories from law enforcement leaders sharing successes and best practices from their jurisdictions.

Recent Headlines

Woodland Police HOST Team Offers Insight on Daily Routine

“They are people too, and some feel that they don’t belong,” police officer Gina Bell said simply before leaving the office dressed in her brown shirt and green pants, which designate the Homeless Outreach Street Team from regular patrol staff who are dressed in traditional blue. “It breaks my heart since we are trying to help them.”

Teaching Police to Holster Their Emotions

Crisis-intervention training teaches officers to recognize symptoms of mental illness while conditioning them to decelerate their approach to someone in distress. Common tactics involve remaining at a distance to avoid startling or riling the person, attempting to persuade instead of demanding compliance, and posing open-ended questions to nurture conversation.