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NRRC program logoThe National Reentry Resource Center provides education, training, and technical assistance to states, tribes, territories, local governments, service providers, non-profit organizations, and corrections institutions working on prisoner reentry. To learn more, click here.

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Recent Posts

NRRC Director: Second Chance Month is Over, But a New Era of Work Must Begin

NRRC Director: Second Chance Month is Over, But a New Era of Work Must Begin

As April comes to a close, so does Second Chance Month, a time designated to focus attention on the millions of people returning from prison or jail each year. Ensuring their reentry back into communities is safe and successful matters to everyone. So it’s heartening to reflect on the momentum that now exists, and begin defining the future of reentry.

Second Chance Act Q&A: Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts

Second Chance Act Q&A: Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts

“Reentry is a process. It begins when individuals first enter our corrections system, not when they are about to exit it. We assess their needs, engage them in a plan for the future, provide them opportunities for positive change through treatment and programming, and equip them with job skills and healthy relationship habits.”

Second Chance Month Q&A: U.S. Representative Jim Sensenbrenner

Second Chance Month Q&A: U.S. Representative Jim Sensenbrenner

“Since the Second Chance Act was implemented, more than 160,000 men, women, and youth have benefitted from Second Chance Act grants. For example, in my home state of Wisconsin, we saw a 20 percent decrease in recidivism over a 10-year period after implementing reentry support programs. I’d call that a success.”

Second Chance Month Q&A: U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy

Second Chance Month Q&A: U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy

“The vast majority of people in our criminal justice system will one day be released. We all have a stake in ensuring they can succeed. It reduces recidivism and saves money. It’s also just the right thing to do.”

U.S. House Members Express Support for Key Justice Programs

U.S. House Members Express Support for Key Justice Programs

Congressional leaders in April took strong bipartisan action in support of three programs in FY 2020—the Second Chance Act, the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Act (MIOTCRA), and the Justice Reinvestment Initiative (JRI)—aimed at increasing public safety and reducing recidivism at the local and state levels.

Announcements

[Register for Webinar] Innovative Programming for Veterans in the Criminal Justice System

[Register for Webinar] Innovative Programming for Veterans in the Criminal Justice System

This webinar will focus on the programming developed specifically for veterans in two jurisdictions—the Middlesex County Sheriff’s Office in Massachusetts and the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department in California—and explain how these jurisdictions developed partnerships with their Veterans Affairs resources and other entities in their criminal justice systems.

Webinars

Promoting Your Reentry Work During Second Chance Month

Promoting Your Reentry Work During Second Chance Month

The National Reentry Resource Center and JustLeadershipUSA hosted this webinar about ways to promote your reentry work. The presenters discuss resources that have been created to help you achieve your goals and raise awareness about successful reentry.

2018 Second Chance Act Orientation for Adult Reentry and Employment Strategic Planning Grant Program

2018 Second Chance Act Orientation for Adult Reentry and Employment Strategic Planning Grant Program

During this webinar, recipients of 2018 Second Chance Act (SCA) Adult Reentry and Employment Strategic Planning grants received information on the requirements and deliverables of the program. Specifically, grantees learned how they will develop a strategic plan that is comprehensive, collaborative, and multisystemic in its approach to increase economic mobility and reduce recidivism for people returning to the community from incarceration.

Publications

Promoting Reentry Success through Increased Access to Social Security Benefits

Promoting Reentry Success through Increased Access to Social Security Benefits

This publication examines how jails across the United States are implementing the Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Insurance Outreach, Access, and Recovery (SOAR) model, which is designed to help people who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness and have a serious mental illness with access to Social Security Administration disability benefits.

Survivor Reentry Project

Survivor Reentry Project

The project raises awareness of criminal record clearance options for survivors of human trafficking and helps to build sustainable post-conviction representation practices across the country.

Recent headlines

Sonoma County Launches In-Depth Review of its Juvenile Justice System

The Sonoma County Probation Department recently launched a comprehensive review of its juvenile justice system to determine how well department policies and practices align with what research shows works to improve outcomes for youth while using resources efficiently.

Ending Mass Incarceration Won’t Succeed without Giving People a Second Chance

This focus on an incarcerated person’s overall well-being represents a shift in how reentry programs are modeled, Carrie Pettus-Davis, an associate professor at Florida State University says. It’s based on helping them develop healthy thinking patterns, effective coping strategies, meaningful work trajectories, positive social engagement, and favorable interpersonal relationships.

[Opinion] How I ‘Jump-Started’ My Life after Prison

My story, and others celebrated during April, provide support for a wholesale rethinking of America’s approach to extreme prison sentences. Incarceration must be based on acceptance of responsibility and taking steps to improve your life, not simply to punish.

County Commits to Reducing Mental Illness in Jail

The resolution commits the county, led by the County Administrative Office, Sheriff’s Office, and the Probation and Health Departments, to a “call to action” that includes “sharing lessons” learned from other counties in the state and nationally.

They’re Haunted by ‘Ghost Warrants’ Years after Their Arrests

Erroneous or outdated criminal charges that linger on a person’s record for years—also known as “sticky warrants”—can result either from prosecutors and probation departments refusing to drop minor cases from the distant past, or from outright clerical errors.

Minor Crimes Get ‘Clean Slate’ in Utah

The Administrative Office of the Courts identifies eligible cases and notifies the Department of Public Safety to expunge records. The office estimates about 30,000 cases will be eligible each year.

County Eases Path to Housing for People with Arrest Records

The Just Housing amendment “will provide greater family stability for more than 3,300 people who return to communities in my district each year from prison,” said Commissioner Brandon Johnson, the amendment’s chief sponsor.

$600 Million Available for Rural Broadband

According to the USDA, funds will be awarded to projects that have financially sustainable business models that will bring high-speed broadband to rural homes, businesses, farms, ranches and community facilities such as first responders, health care sites and schools.