Recent Posts

Congress Funds Key Criminal Justice Programs

Congress Funds Key Criminal Justice Programs

Congress approved a $1.15 trillion Omnibus Appropriations bill that would fund three key programs championed by The Council of State Governments (CSG) Justice Center: the Second Chance Act (SCA), the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Act (MIOTCRA), and the Justice Reinvestment Initiative. The spending bill includes the fiscal year 2016 Commerce, Justice, Science (CJS) Appropriations bill, which provides $28.7 billion to support U.S. Department of Justice programs.

Study Highlights Little State Oversight of Educational Services Provided to Incarcerated Youth

Study Highlights Little State Oversight of Educational Services Provided to Incarcerated Youth

The report, “Locked Out: Improving Educational and Vocational Outcomes for Incarcerated Youth,” reveals that despite spending between $100,000 and $300,000 per incarcerated child in secure facilities, only 13 states provide all incarcerated youth with access to the same types of educational services that students have in the community. Meanwhile, only nine states offer community-equivalent vocational services to all kids in lock-up.

Three States Granted Funds to Facilitate Wide-Ranging Juvenile Justice System Reforms

Three States Granted Funds to Facilitate Wide-Ranging Juvenile Justice System Reforms

North Carolina, Virginia, and Iowa have been chosen by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) to receive more than $700,000 each to improve the juvenile justice systems in their respective jurisdictions as part of the FY2015 Second Chance Act Comprehensive Statewide Juvenile Reentry System Reform Implementation Program.

Berrien County, MI, Expands Training, Collaboration Around Juvenile Justice

Berrien County, MI, Expands Training, Collaboration Around Juvenile Justice

The Family Division of the Berrien County Trial Court in Michigan decided in 2001 that its juvenile justice practices simply weren’t working. That meant restructuring the county’s juvenile justice procedures around evidence-based practices, starting by using risk assessments to determine which youth were more likely to commit another offense and thus required more intensive interventions and supervision.

Announcements

Webinars

Improving Outcomes for Young Adults in the Justice System

Improving Outcomes for Young Adults in the Justice System

This webinar focuses on how juvenile and criminal justice policymakers and agency leaders can work to reduce recidivism and improve other outcomes for young adults between the ages of 18 and 24 who are involved in these systems. Presenters discuss young adults’ distinct needs, as well as the limited research available on what works to address these needs, and recommend potential steps that policymakers, juvenile and adult criminal justice agency leaders, researchers, and the field can take to improve outcomes for this group of young people.

Using New Checklists to Assess Juvenile Justice Systems

Using New Checklists to Assess Juvenile Justice Systems

This webinar highlights three checklists focused on reducing juvenile recidivism, which are now available on the CSG Justice Center website. These checklists can help state and local officials assess whether their juvenile justice system’s policies and practices are aligned with the research on “what works” to reduce recidivism, and to identify opportunities for improvement.

2015 Second Chance Act Orientation for Young Father Mentoring Grantees

During this webinar, FY2015 Strengthening Relationships Between Young Fathers and their Children grantees receive information about the grant program, including steps for getting the program started, submission of the Planning and Implementation Guide, and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention expectations.

2015 Second Chance Act Orientation for Juvenile Reentry Grantees

During this webinar, FY2015 Second Chance Act grantees that are developing and implementing juvenile reentry initiatives hear from U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention staff about the Second Chance Act, including grant requirements and management.

Publications

Recent headlines

Massachusetts Had Hundreds of Suspensions Last Year—In Kindergarten and Pre-K

Massachusetts public and charter schools suspended kindergarten and pre-kindergarten students 603 times in the 2014-15 school year, a WBUR analysis of state data shows. Students in their first year of school were sent home for offenses that included hitting, disrupting, disrespecting, throwing things and fighting.

Opinion: Why School Suspensions Don’t Work

I never had a student change his behavior for the better because he was suspended. Most of the time students returned and reoffended. Time away from school seemed to exacerbate problems, not fix them.